Angela 0

09 Oct 2017, 04:08 PM

I'm Angela Keaton of Antiwar.com, Ask Me Anything Friday, 10/13 12-4pm PT

I am an anarchist person. 

Comments (33)

  • Paul B. Walker

    about 3 months ago

    What does it mean to be an anarchist?

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Dear Paul, for the basics of my world view, please read my thoughts on liberty

      While my views on anarchism do evolve and change with life experience, an anarchist is someone who practises peaceful acts of non-violence as a moral and social norm. The non aggression principle is not a political theory but a pro-active approach to life where voluntary co-operation and competition are the basis of social interaction. 

  • David Dominique

    about 3 months ago

    Thank you, Angela, for doing this Ask Me Anything Session. How about the military agreements the US has signed with other countries? How about NATO? What should be done?

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      David, I am glad to be here. I read the Freeman as a little girl. FEE has grown and changed but still has the soul of Leonard Read. 

      The military agreements the US has with other countries are for the benefit of political elites and crony capitalism. They are not to benefit the US tax payers nor do they in anyway help the people of those countries.  Foreign aid to dictators, alliances, US meddling in foreign elections (read: CIA overthrowing democratically elected leaders) are not commitments to which any moral person shall be held. 

      NATO is a street gang that carpet bombs.  No decent person would want any part of that. 

  • Tricia Beck

    about 3 months ago

    Hi Angela! Thanks for doing this! I have a few questions:

    1. How do we dismantle the military-industrial complex?

    2. Is there a connection between war and traditional masculinity? Is there a way to create a less violent cultural construct of masculinity? 

    3. Why is American cinema obsessed with war stories and glorifying combat?

    4. Can you tell us a light-hearted nonsequitor so that we don't get super bogged down in the awfulness of war?

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Tricia, so glad we could make this AMA happen. 

      1.) By fighting militarism at every level, in every way in every day. Begin at home. Do not send children to government schools where the genocidal foundings of the country and chattel slavery are glossed over as ancient history when the battle of Wounded Knee only occurred in 1890. Do not expose innocent children to the evils of manifest destiny or the domino theory or "white" feminism which supports military actions under the guise of liberation against the express wishes of the women in Afghanistan   Do not let them lionize mass murderers like Harry Truman and Woodrow Wilson.

      Continue the demilitarization by not forcing one's child to say the pledge of allegiance or have a discussion about what the Star Spangled Banner expresses.  For teenagers, engage in counter recruitment. Protest military presence on campuses.    Write to Southwest and ask them to stop glorifying passengers who are active duty. Enlist vets from the libertarians. They are often the most outspoken about the war.     This answer could take four hours so let's move to #2.

      2. Yes. No. Not unless there is an understanding under the cis-het model of family that the man is to provide and protect for his wife and children. Enabling heavy taxation and the causes terrorism is a moral failing among their true masculine duty. 

      3. Every thing from the nationalism 99.9% percent of everyone including many libertarians support all the way to the CIA working with Hollywood. The American people have a need to be the good guy irrespective of the facts. History is written that way so no one questions it. 

      For those interest in alternative theoris on American history, both Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States" and Tom Woods' The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History are good places to start 

      4.) Every time a man quotes from the Princess Bride, I have to breath through my nose to avoid gaggin. 

  • Emanuele Ottolini

    about 3 months ago

    Hi Angela, thanks for this session of ask me anything! I have some questions:

    what do you think about exporting democracy or better freedom? Let's think about Japan after ww2 or Afghanistan in the recent period, in both situations we have a huge improvement in the liberty, it's enough see some statistics before and after US occupation... 

    What's wrong with that two examples ?  Why it should be a mistake apply the same process today in place like  North Korea, Venezuela  or in a more  general situation where we have a government that kills freedom ? Thanks in advance 

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Thank you. Glad to be here. 

      1. "what do you think about exporting democracy or better freedom?"  I don't. My life is about me. 

      The premise is that democracy is inherently good, moral, just and functional? It is merely functional. It allows for the illusion of the ordinary man to believe he has some say in his fate. In the US, "Democracy" is the civic religion. A combination of the blandest forms of European Protestantism with ever present American* nationalism to distract from the loss of liberties for all (for many groups in the US have never had access to liberty) and an economic system which depends on slight of hand and ignorance to maintain itself. 

      Those examples are horrible. The US is the first and only country to have dropped nuclear bombs then rationalize it as a means to peace and prosperity. The (continued) US occupation of Japan does not make Japan "better." Ask the young Japanese girls who are raped by US soldiers about "better freedom." 

      By what measure is Afghanistan freer due to any aspect of the USG? The US backed the most extreme criminal elements and destroyed the country. Still destroying -- the Emperor Trump wants war forever and ever.

      2. All governments kill freedom. That's the function of governments. 

      The only process the USG should perform is removing itself from Korea. The US has no place in Venezuela beyond individual private acts of free trade.Venezuelans are fully formed humans. They can sort out their own problems, an obvious one being USG hostility and interference. 

      The only people who think that there would be any difference between Nicolás Maduro's brand of authoritarianism as compared to Leopoldo López' brand of horror are naive young North Americans from privileged classes and assorted hucksters who profit from more explicitly right wing regimes. 

      *To North Americans, everything over here is America.

  • Cory Massimino

    about 3 months ago

    What's the biggest mistake that leads otherwise solid libertarians astray on issues of war and peace?

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Painful self awarness about their shortcomings as men. That and racism. 

  • Laurie Williams

    about 3 months ago

    Hi, Angela! thanks for your time, and all your service to liberty to date!
     
    1. Is there any hope of reviving the Anti-War left? Short of a draft, how can we motivate middle class professionals and college students to act to identify with "volunteer" military families, or protect the civilians they slaughter?

    2. Did Tillerson make the right choice re: UNESCO? What factors haven't received enough consideration?  

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Laurie,

      Glad we can speak again. 

      1.) The Antiwar left never went anywhere. All 361 of them are still there. It's the antiwar liberals who discovered joys of empire. No. They are never coming back. It's both a problem of political parties filling the void that secularization leaves and that liberalism is ultimately reactionary. 

      I have been trying to figure that out for 9 and half years. 

      2.) Yes. UNESCO is one of many distribution schemes for USG bribes.

  • Dan Sanchez

    about 3 months ago

    How do you interpret Randolph Bourne's phrase, "War is the health of the State"?

    • Agbator Alex

      about 3 months ago

      It helps a lot in economics. When the U.S. was in the great depression, WWII brought them out of it.

      They needed to use the army, which then we paid companies to give them the resources for the war. It created many jobs, and started circulating money again.

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

       No. 

  • Timothy Myshrall

    about 3 months ago

    How can it be moral for me to be a part of the labor force when I know that a significant portion of the federal income tax that I must pay as a result of my work goes towards funding the military and manufacturers of military equipment. Am I not in part responsible for providing the economic means for the military to conduct war and for the militarization of U.S. police departments (which receives military hand-me-downs) that provides the means for greater aggression against American citizens?

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      It isn't. Yes.

      This is true of nearly everyone and everything. The USG is a world wide police state. 

  • Pat Regan

    about 3 months ago

    Have you used Gapminder.com to illustrate any global point(s) in relation to war/poverty/torture?  Can you suggest any other data driven websights that make clear connections to free trade and peaceful relations between countries.

    • Laurie Williams

      about 3 months ago

      @Pat I use Gapminder.com academically but have NEVER seen it used to make pro liberty or anti state messages - do you have links to share? FASCINATED.

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      No. When I want trade info for my purposes, I go to Cato.org.

    • Pat Regan

      about 3 months ago

      @Laurie; I have no links but I do use gapminder and one examples would be to place 'Aid Received', from Economy Folder, on one axis.  I have found no correlation to any other topics.  My goal is simply to look at the data and let the numbers speak for themselves. The motion graphs tell so much.  As far as numbers I also look at USAFACTS.org but now I will dive into Cato.org

      'The world is my Country, all mankind are my Brethren, to do good is my Religion' ~Thomas Paine

  • Tricia Beck

    about 3 months ago

    Requesting another light nonsequitor to break up the sadness of talking about war.

    • Jeffrey Tucker

      about 3 months ago

      whoops! true this 

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Think all the questions are answered. Sad that no one asked me to sort out the Kardashian/Jenner family tree.

  • Jacob Morgan

    about 3 months ago

    Dear Angela,

    Would Antiwar.com be interested in sponosring an Students For Liberty Regional Conference that will be on November 11th at Texas Tech in Lubbock, Texas? 

    The theme is Anarchy at the Border: The Case For A New Humanitarian Directive. 

    If you are interested then please send me an email at [email protected]

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Jacob, 

      I willl shoot you an email. 

  • Mike Seebeck

    about 3 months ago

    Heya, too long time no see! 🤗

    We really need to get together out here in CO and catch up on things!

    Here in the heart of military space, there is a big movement to deal with militarizing space, with everything from satellite-on-satellite warfare to hacking and everything in between. How can we demilitarize space?

    Also, how's the FBI mess resolution going?

    TTYS, & ❤

    Mike & Lidia

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Mike, the grassroots activism against militarism begins with your fellow engineers, gearheads, and techs. You all have the knowledge of the dangers. Talk to normals about what sort of chaos we would have if satelites get wiped out. People think tech is magic. They don't know how their I phones work and they don't want to know. A lot like our current foreign policy. 

      We aren't getting rid of hacking. That's like death and taxes now. 

      Thanks for asking. Eric and Justin have won parts of the case. The ACLU continues to challenge the rest. 6 years and counting...

      Give my love to the family. 

  • Laurie Rice

    about 3 months ago

    Hello Angela :) Thank you so much for appearing for FEE. I'm excited that you are doing this. Just a few questions: 

    1. What war-based project of the US government do you think is the most harmful or most urgent to try to dissolve at this time? 

    2. What are your favorite quotes about war/peace?

    3. What do you think of Taylor Swift's new album so far?

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      My fellow objectivist!

      1. The USG's relationships with the governments of Saudi Arabia and Israel. 

      2.  Force and mind are opposites; morality ends where a gun begins. - Ayn Rand

      3.  Taylor Swift undercuts her finely cultivated alpha high femme with the video to "Look What You Made Me Do." Swift's long lean small busted body type suites her whip wielding lesbian dominance but she is not convincing swathed in diamonds languishing in the bathtub.  Compare to another artist who knows her sexual power, Rihanna in "Stay" where the power ballad meshes with each movement of her hands while she soaks defeated by an admission of love.Overall, I am very impressed by the young lesbian and bisexual artists who embrace couture, make up lines and femme/femme romances. 

  • Jeffrey Tucker

    about 3 months ago

    Hey, Angela. Do you see the problem of war as mainly a problem of the institution of the state, or an extension of the darkest aspect of the human personality? In other words, do you see the fix as mainly an issue of institutional reform or spiritual enlightenment? Or is this really the same problem? 

    • Angela

      about 3 months ago

      Prof. Tucker,  Both.

      "The institution of the state" is war. War against the world's poor. War against American Indians. War against black Americans. War against everyone who isn't a member of the ruling class. War against the individual as something unique and sacred.

      Seeking power over others is the darkest aspect of humanity. As long as there is a large centralized government, the worst among us will capture it. There is no institutional reform. The institutions are oppressive by design. 

      Centuries of secular Protestantism combined with the nostrums of modern state makes spritual enlightenment unlikely. 

  • Angela

    about 3 months ago

    I am still working on these. We had some unsettling news but we are back on line.